FAQs

Q?

Is therapy right for me?

A.

Some people believe that therapy is right for everyone; that “who couldn’t benefit from a little therapy?”  While I personally believe that there are good number of people who can benefit from my services, it is my experience that unless a person is truly open and ready to do their own work, then therapy can actually create a negative experience for the person so that when they might be truly ready to make a change, their experience with therapy was less than enjoyable.  My job is not to fix people; it is to support individuals, couples and families who are looking for a new path, by reflecting their own strength back to them. There are clearly some clients who are 99 percent against changing their behaviors or thoughts, but it takes 1 percent, some thread of interest or hope, for the process to be successful.

Q?

What is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist?

A.

When choosing a therapist to work with, you might wonder what the difference between all the various credentials are. As a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, I have been trained to work under the framework of systems theory. This enables me to understand my clients based on his or her environment and particular situations. As a result, the benefit of working with a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist is that, whether you are seeking individual, couples, family or group therapy, it permits for each participant to feel heard and understood in the process of creating goals and solutions in a collaborative manner.

Think of it like this, you and your situation are unique.  What has lead you to this point and guided you this far needs to be understood so that we can work together, you and I, to discover the best solution going forward.  Rather than, me giving you the answers, you will find my session to be a highly collaborative experience, one that will leave you feeling confident and refreshed.  Click here to learn more about me.

Q?

How many sessions until I see results?

A.

I work under the understanding that counseling is an investment, both in time and financially. Therefore, I strive to work with individuals, couples, and families with only the right amount of sessions until they find the transformation they need. Generally, in about 12 sessions, most find the results they are looking. It has happened in less than 12 sessions as well. In some situations, depending on the case, a longer plan might be needed, such as when experiencing trauma, or a mental health issue.

Q?

Can therapy substitute medication and vice-versa?

A.

Not everyone seeking counseling need medication; however, if you are taking medication for a mental health issue, research indicates that combining both counseling and medication is best. The medication helps with the physical symptoms of the mental health issue, and the counseling helps with the thinking and behavioral patterns.

Click below to read more about this.
https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Treatment/Mental-Health-Medications

Q?

What is a relationship expert?

A.

As a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, I have committed my career to studying and working with individualscouples, and families to transform their lives and improve their relationships. Whether wanting to work on yourself, your relationship with your partner, or your family dynamics, I specialize in helping people enhance their lives and relationships. I have completed a Master in Marriage and Family Therapy and worked in outpatient, impatient, and private practice settings to assist individuals to find change in their life goals and relationships they are looking to improve.

Q?

Why work with a relationship expert when I want in individual sessions?

A.

As humans, we are social in nature and our mental and physical health depend on having healthy relationships. This means working on our relationships with our significant others, with our children, relatives, co-workers and with yourself. Whether you are looking at working on depression, anxiety, grief, addictions, or many more, the relationship you are seeking to improve is with yourself.

Q?

How is psychotherapy different from asking advice from a priest, a close friend or my family?

A.

Having a support system comprised of a priest, a close friend or a family member is a great resource. Sharing or “venting” can be helpful; however, if you are finding that you feel the same or just not good enough after talking to your support system, counseling might be a better fit for your situation. In counseling, while working with a therapist, you will get a professional trained to work with relationships, mental health issues, and unwanted feelings. A counselor is trained in scientific, researched- based theories , treatment models and techniques to help individuals obtain change.

Q?

Why work with a therapist or counselor instead of a coach?

A.

Therapists and counselor hold a state license, such as license for marriage and family therapists, license for mental health practitioners, licensed psychologists, and licensed social workers.. Licenses are regulated by the Department of Health of each state, and as such therapists and counselors are legally bound to follow laws, rules of practice, and obtain continuous education in order to maintain their license. Additionally, all licensed therapists and counselors have to complete graduate work in order to become eligible to obtain a license.

Q?

Isn’t therapy just for “crazy people”?

A.

This is one the biggest misconceptions about therapy, one that keeps people from benefiting from a significant source of support and help. Another misconception is that seeing a therapist is a sign of weakness. In fact, quite the opposite is true. Recognizing the need for professional help and making the decision and action to seek therapy is a sign of  strength and your decision to give yourself the opportunity to live the life that you want!

Q?

Is therapy confidential?

A.

Counseling is confidential by law, according to Florida Statute 491.0147 and can be shared with another person only with the client’s prior written consent. Exceptions to therapeutic confidentiality are as follows:

1) Any mental health professional is required by law to report to authorities any suspicion of child abuse or neglect, and/or elder/adult abuse or neglect.

2) In the event that the therapist has reason to believe that a client is of danger to others, or to him/herself (e.g. has active suicidal and/or homicidal plans), the therapist must report this danger to the appropriate authorities AND to the person(s) who may be in danger.

3) Mental health professionals are required to reveal client information when ordered by a judge.

4) Mental health professionals can reveal information when named as a defendant in a lawsuit brought by you, the client.

5) In the event that domestic violence is reported by the client, AND minor children are currently living in the home, mental health professionals are required to report this to the appropriate authorities such as, but not limited to, the Florida Department of Children and Families.